15 CORNERS OF THE WORLD

LET YOUR EYES FOLLOW YOUR EARS

Q&A

ZUZANNA SOLAKIEWICZ – DIRECTOR
We took the unconventional approach to making "15 Corners of the World". First there was the soundtrack. It guided us to the images. This order was the result of the inspiration that we found in the metaphors and visual parallels used by Rudnik himself. In his notes and journals he describes sound and music as something visible. Yet the listener has no access to this realm. The audience of the film does - the viewer watches our interpretation of this sensual and emotional way of seeing music.

ZVIKA GREGORY PORTNOY – CINEMATOGRAPHER
Shooting "15 Corners of the World" was a great challenge. I wanted to dialogue with Rudnik's music with the use of images. My photography does not illustrate the music, but neither is it composed of accidental, abstract impressions. The image combined with the sound creates a new layer of meaning.

MATEUSZ ROMASZKAN - EDITOR
The challenge we took, that is - the attempt to see and touch music, can bring video art to mind. Yet "15 Corners of the World" has a structure and course, dramaturgy and an expressive protagonist. It is a truly classical film in the way it is constructed, filmed and edited. This makes it much more accessible and viewer-friendly than many other experimental films.

MARCIN LENARCZYK
After the release of the CD dj LENAR/RePRES where I used Rudnik’s work as a starting point for a series of transformations and interpretations, it turned out that I could dive even deeper into his world. It was an invaluable experience – being able to follow his way of thinking about art, learning his composing techniques directly from him. It was an almost moving opportunity to ask all the questions that I had for him. Never before had I worked on a film so integrated with my personal ambition and artistic needs.

WERONIKA PELCZYŃSKA – CHOREOGRAPHER
Rudnik's pieces, sound images built upon atmospheres, remind me of the way contemporary choreographers work. In contemporary dance we often use qualities instead of forms. There is, obviously, a form that bears meaning. But everything begins with movement, often abstract at first. While creating the choreography for the film the director and I played with sound and rhythm - being ahead of it or ignoring it altogether. We wanted to create something ambiguous, something capable of opening people's imagination.

MARTA GOLBA
The decision to shoot the film on 16 mm negative was obvious to us even though nowadays it is unusual. We wanted to pay tribute to the analogue era that is slowly becoming the past. It is also literally passing. When we used up the type of negative that we needed, it turned out that the Fuji factory stopped its production at all. We got hold of the missing two more film reels in Great Britain, after a long search.

ERIC WINKER – CO-PRODUCER
We loved this project immediately. It is cinematically challenging, very unusual and special. And it is also connected to Cologne, the home of the German music pioneer Karlheinz Stockhausen, a colleague and collaborator of Eugeniusz Rudnik. It was fascinating to do the sound mix in Stockhausen´s old studio and to cooperate with the fantastic Polish team. A collaboration that hopefully will continue in the future.